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April 1, 2019

WHEN YOU’RE SHOPPING FOR SUNSCREEN, HERE ARE SOME KEY THINGS TO LOOK FOR:


1. The absence of oxybenzone and octinoxate in listed ingredients. These two chemicals are harmful to corals and can cause sunscreen-induced coral bleaching, so look for them in the ingredient list. Their absence points the product being reef-safe.

2. Mineral based sunscreen with the ingredients zinc oxide and titanium dioxide. Sunscreens made with zinc oxide and titanium dioxide are mineral-based, so rather than being absorbed like traditional sunscreen, the particles of these ingredients sit on top of the skin and block harmful UV rays. These ingredients are less harmful to corals and are not linked to coral bleaching.

3. Indication that ingredients are “non-nano”. In order for mineral sunblocks to leave corals untouched, they must be “non-nano”, meaning the ingredient particles must be above 100 nanometers in size so that they cannot be ingested by corals.

4. Reef-safe labels. Typically companies will label their...

March 30, 2019

Jayme Cellitioci is the principal of ULU Consulting.

Jayme's passion for connecting the public with science and nature has brought her to the Netherlands, Greece, New Zealand, Australia, Indonesia, Hawaii and across the mainland US, engaging people in science-based experiences. Combining a B.S. in Psychobiology and an M.S. in Creativity and Change Leadership from the International Center for Studies in Creativity, Jayme is highly energized by the process of designing creative and transformative free-choice science learning experiences for children, adults and families.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h0zZGHo9BHs#action=share

March 23, 2019

Meet the engineer who is transforming traditional boats to run on solar energy!

December 30, 2018

The Mediterranean has a very serious microplastic problem!

Check out the article:

The Mediterranean has a very serious microplastic problem!

https://m.facebook.com/story.php?story_fbid=2076354785761504&id=1143803202301544

December 10, 2018

We need to stop consuming and stop producing plastic.

https://www.facebook.com/713255682200231/posts/970978159761314/

October 13, 2018

Facts:


- 90% is imported from Asia

- Shrimps are grown in filthy pool farms, full of bacterias, antibiotics, desinfectants, and pesticides (which most of them are banned in the USA)

- The pools are so crowded that shrimps die, increasing the amount of bacterias

- The eyes of the female shrimps are cut out (eye ablation) to make them breed faster as is causes them to develop mature over ease. This causes a traumatic and stressful reaction to the shrimp.

- It harms the environment with pollution and deforestation

- There is slave labor implicated in the shrimp industry. If you consume you support and feed this horrible human trafficking

WHAT'S YOUR CHOICE???

#ourchoicesmatter

Sources: @thephuketnews, greenvillagegazette.com, reporterbrazil.org, otherwords.org, @be_amazedxd

June 29, 2018

Emily Penn tested her own body for some of the toxic chemicals that are found when plastics break down in the oceans, the results are alarming!

Penn is currently in Hawaii, where she will begin her journey in a 72 foot research vessel called the Sea Dragon. The ship will make a two-legged journey, first from Hawaii to Vancouver and then from Vancouver to Seattle. Ten women from around the world will sail with Penn for each leg of the journey.

Check out the full article and support this Ocean warriors:

https://www.ecowatch.com/sea-dragon-ocean-plastic-2581811358.html?fbclid=IwAR3jZ6w9C8X7AzcXq7jxczExTp2HAxHTM3PeRNnpynx5jsITIWmb3bTVLMs

April 15, 2018

The Pacific Ocean is massive. It's the world's largest and deepest ocean, and if you gathered up all of the Earth's continents, these land masses would fit into the Pacific basin with a space the size of Africa to spare.

While the Pacific Ocean holds more than half of the planet's free water, it also unfortunately holds a lot of the planet's garbage (much of it plastic).

But that trash isn't spread evenly across the Pacific Ocean; a great deal of it ends up suspended in what are commonly referred to as "garbage patches."

April 14, 2018

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